Learning Brief: The role of education in addressing climate change

Learning Brief: The role of education in addressing climate change

Even without the imposition of climate change, caring for the environment  is a pre-requisite for survival. While many environmental issues may lie in the domain of government control, communities that are better informed about such matters are more able to adapt to catastrophic environmental events.

The education system – and specifically the SADC Care and Support for Teaching and Learning framework – offers an effective vehicle to drive a response to the very real threat of climate change and related anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment.

Download: Learning Brief – climate change

First CSTL Conference a Success

First CSTL Conference a Success

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in partnership with MIET AFRICA and UNICEF, hosted the inaugural national Care and Support for Teaching and Learning (CSTL) Conference on 12-13 June 2018 in Irene, Pretoria.

More than 230 delegates ranging from CSTL policy implementers, policy makers, policy influencers, learners, and educators attended the Conference which was opened by Minister of Basic Education, Angie Motshekga. “On our journey of a thousand miles, we are not alone…we are grateful for the support and guidance of organisations like UNICEF and MIET AFRICA, “said Motshekga.

Under the theme Consolidating our collective efforts, the purpose of the conference was to share the DBE’s framework for care and support, and provide an opportunity for partners to discuss the initiatives currently being implemented in schools within CSTL’s 10 priority areas and in  the areas of partnership, multisectoral collaboration and system strengthening in support of policy implementation.

CSTL South Africa

CSTL South Africa

CSTL is a response by Ministries of Education in South Africa and the SADC region to the many issues threatening the provision of quality education for children. CSTL, or Care and Support for Teaching and Learning aims to transform schools into inclusive centres of learning, care and support where children stay in school and thrive. Watch this short overview on how CSTL South Africa ensures that every child has access to quality education, and the bright future they deserve.

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Child marriages outlawed in Zimbabwe

Child marriages outlawed in Zimbabwe

With effect from 20 January 2016, no person, male or female, may enter into any marriage, including an unregistered customary law union or any other union, including one arising out of religion or religious rite, before attaining the age of 18.

This ground breaking ruling by the full Constitutional Court in Zimbabwe followed an application by two Harare women (aged 19 and 20 years), themselves child brides, seeking to challenge the Customary Marriages Act, arguing that the Act was infringing on the constitutional rights of young girls and boys and exposing the girl child to the devastating consequences of early marriage: depriving girls of an education, exposing them to sexual violence, increasing the risks of sexually transmitted infections including HIV, early pregnancy and related maternal and child mortality. Both the incidence of child marriage and the consequences are exacerbated by poverty, especially in rural areas with poor access to services.

CSTL comes to Cape Town: Annual Sharing Meeting, 23-26 November 2015

CSTL comes to Cape Town: Annual Sharing Meeting, 23-26 November 2015

The stunning views of Table Mountain and the Cape Town harbour from the glass lifts of the hotel greeted delegates to the 2015 Annual CSTL Sharing Meeting. Over 70 participants representing SADC Member States attended.

The energy in the opening session was electric, as participants heard inspiring welcoming remarks from SDC (the funder), the SADC Secretariat and MIET AFRICA’s CEO. Then Mr Rindai Jaravaza, an MIET AFRICA Trustee, gave a powerful keynote address, setting out the factors critical to successful implementation, including transparency, accountability, clear communication, and realism. His closing words are a wake-up call for all of us: “When I went to school, the key resources were the black board, chalk and a whip. This will not suffice in the rights based societies of today!”
The opening session ended with a bang, literally. Delegates were treated to a performance by the Pennsylvanians, a Cape Townian minstrel band.